Stock Up (on Stock) for Flu Season!

Forget the flu shot; get some chicken stock! It’s the famous Jewish penicillin.

As the weather gets colder and the sniffles begin, add ‘whole chicken’ to your grocery list. According to Sally Fallon in her book Nourishing Traditions, “Properly prepared, meat stocks are extremely nutritious, containing the minerals of bone, cartilage, marrow and vegetables as electrolytes, a form that is easy to assimilate.” Both delicious and nutritious, chicken stock has been tagged as ‘superior’ to everything else, even more relaxing than Tylenol.

Stock can be made from all sorts of meats (fish, lamb, venison, duck, you name it), but I have only made it from chicken, so that’s what I’ll share with you today. While modern research confirms that stock helps “prevent and mitigate infectious diseases”, don’t save this for times when you’re under the weather. You’ll find that the flavor is simply irresistible. Make it and become known as an excellent, health-conscious cook!

Chicken Stock

1 whole chicken

3 – 4 quarts of water

2 – 4 T. sea salt

1 T. apple cider vinegar

4 medium onions, coarsely chopped

8 carrots, coarsely chopped

6 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

2 – 4 zucchini, chopped

4 – 6 T. coconut oil

5 garlic cloves

4 inches grated ginger (3/4 t. dried)

1 bunch fresh parsley

 

INSTRUCTIONS: Place all ingredients except the parsley in a large pot. {A stockpot is a very important piece of equipment to have in your kitchen!} Bring to a boil. Remove the scum. Cover and cook on low for 12 – 24 hours. The longer you cook the stock, the richer and more flavorful it will be. Add parsley for the last 5 minutes. Take the pot off the stove. Remove the chicken. Let it cool a bit before taking the meat from the carcass. Use the meat as desired – for chicken salad, enchiladas, etc. (but do not leave any of it in the stock). Strain the stock (removing all the vegetables and spices) through cheese cloth or a thin towel. Refrigerate/freeze or can the liquid. (If canning, place in quart jars in a pressure canner at 10 lbs. pressure for 25 minutes.)

 

‘Good broth’, says a South American proverb, ‘resurrects the dead.’  Don’t wait until then to try this recipe!

 

 

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